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6/9/14 - $7.3 Million Granted to 69 Nonprofits in All Five Boroughs and Nationwide

CONTACT
David Marcus, (212) 889-3963, dlm@nyct-cfi.org
Amy Wolf (212) 686-0010 x234, aw@nyct-cfi.org

New York (June 9, 2014)—The New York Community Trust is giving $7.3 million to nonprofit groups to help victims of human trafficking; stop gang violence throughout the City; build young leaders in Far Rockaway; and strengthen small businesses across the South Bronx. A group of grants also will help a half-dozen nonprofit medical providers and trade associations adapt to new health care legislation while saving taxpayers’ money.

Thanks to other grants, the Bronx Museum will start a new program addressing health through art; and a leadership group will train Brooklyn high school students to advise the Department of Education. A complete list of grants follows.

HELPING HEALTH AGENCIES ADAPT TO CHANGE

  • A.I.R. NYC, $60,000 to develop sustainable revenue sources for a program that sends health workers to homes of children with asthma to help them avoid ER visits and eliminate triggers such as mold, smoke, and vermin.
  • Center for Urban Community Services, $100,000 to add primary care to a mental health treatment program for formerly homeless, mentally ill adults.
  • Child Center of New York, $140,000 to help a leading Queens child mental health agency prepare for managed care.
  • Community Health Care Association of New York State, $110,000 to strengthen community health centers by helping them comply with new federal requirements.
  • Jewish Association for Services for the Aged, $100,000 to help a leading elder-serving agency prepare for managed long-term care.
  • Institute for Family Health, $100,000 to test new care-coordination programs for patients with chronic health problems, including heart disease.
  • Primary Care Development Corporation, $110,000 for a program to test new models of primary health care, focusing on care coordination, managing chronic disease, and upgrading staff skills.
HEALTH SYSTEMS AND POLICY
  • National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS, $50,000 for a hepatitis C screening and treatment campaign.
  • Public Health Solutions, $100,000 to test a new program that lets girls and young women in the South Bronx answer confidential questions on computers, smartphones, and tablets, and then find the best contraception and local health referrals.
  • Weill Cornell Medical College, $108,000 to expand a stress-reduction and wellness program in Harlem and the South Bronx for low-income Hispanic and African American breast cancer survivors.
HELP FOR THE ELDERLY
  • Carter Burden Center for the Aging, $80,000 to develop an adult day care program for patients being transferred from a City nursing facility on Roosevelt Island to independent senior housing in East Harlem.
  • Griot Circle, $45,000 to strengthen an agency serving gay and lesbian elders of color in Brooklyn.
  • Isabella Geriatric Center, $100,000 to help poor, elderly residents in Washington Heights manage their diabetes.
  • Visiting Nurse Service of New York, $75,000 to train home health aides to provide improved rehabilitation services to chronically ill elders after hospitalization.
HEALTHY EATING IN POOR NEIGHBORHOODS
  • City Harvest, $100,000 to add three new mobile produce markets in Washington Heights, Bed-Stuy, and northwest Queens, and to find new ways of improving unhealthy shopping, cooking, and eating habits in poor neighborhoods.
STRENGTHENING THE ARTS
  • Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation, $100,000 to strengthen leadership of a central Brooklyn multi-arts center.
  • Center for an Urban Future, $50,000 to update the “Creative New York” report that examines the role of the arts in the City’s economy creating jobs, drawing tourists and residents, and generating revenue.
  • New York City Cultural Agenda Fund, $200,000 to establish a collaborative of funders to develop a coordinated cultural policy agenda; build support for small, minority-led, arts groups outside of Manhattan, and develop more diverse audiences in all boroughs.
WHERE ART MEETS HEALTH
  • Bronx Museum of the Arts, $50,000 for Artful Health, a new series of film screenings, storytelling gatherings, and art-making workshops that address community health issues.

EARLY LITERACY
The following grants are from the Brooke Astor Fund for New York City Education:

  • First Book, $180,000 to provide thousands of nonfiction books to kindergarten through third grade classrooms in nine high-poverty schools, then help teachers and parents use the books to improve children’s reading skills.
  • Fordham University, $100,000 to create a training program to help prekindergarten and kindergarten teachers improve students’ vocabulary and reading comprehension.
  • New York University, $682,000 to train teachers to use Latino storytelling traditions and Common Metric—a new method for interpreting student assessment data—to improve prekindergarteners’ reading skills.
  • Union Settlement Association, $115,000 to use photography and oral storytelling to improve reading skills of English-language learners.
MORE EDUCATION GRANTS
  • Computers for Youth Foundation, $75,000 to help middle school math teachers integrate technology into classroom instruction.
  • Coro New York Leadership Center, $60,000 to train Brooklyn high school student leaders to advise Department of Education policymakers.
  • Graduate Center of the City University of New York, $35,000 to help first-generation college students matriculate.
GIRLS AND YOUNG WOMEN
  • Day One, $55,000 to improve how social workers, school counselors, and others work with teens to prevent date rape and abuse, and to advocate for legislation to control abusive “sexting.”
  • Girl Scout Council of Greater New York, $160,000 to transfer leadership of a successful career exploration program to teachers in low-performing middle and high schools.
A BETTER FOSTER CARE SYSTEM
  • Inwood House, $146,000 to continue and expand a program that helps child welfare agencies be more responsive to the needs of young mothers.
  • Graham Windham, $200,000 to enable foster care agencies to use a casework model that helps parents and foster parents develop their own skills to solve family problems.
  • MFY Legal Services, $150,000 to expand legal and social services for seniors and other relatives caring for abandoned children in the Bronx.
NEW YORKERS IN NEED
  • Bridge Fund of New York, $600,000 for cash assistance and counseling for families at risk of losing their homes in 20 neighborhoods in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Manhattan.
  • Financial Clinic, $90,000 to advocate for better access to earned income tax credits (EITC) for cash-earning low-wage workers.
  • Legal Services NYC - Bronx, $55,000 to help residents of the Bronx get and keep public benefits.
  • Partnership for the Homeless, $75,000 for legal and social services to homeless families and those who risk eviction in East New York, Brooklyn.
IMPROVING THE FIELD OF SOCIAL WORK
  • Columbia University, School of Social Work, $35,000 to study ways to improve financial training for social work students.
  • Council on Social Work Education, $190,000 to improve social work education and practice in the field of aging.
HALTING GANG VIOLENCE
  • Crown Heights Mediation Center, $35,000 for an anti-gang violence program in Crown Heights, Brooklyn.
  • LIFE Camp, $35,000 to expand a gang violence prevention program in South Jamaica, Queens.
  •  Man Up! $35,000 for a gang violence prevention program in East New York, Brooklyn.
  • New York City Mission Society, $35,000 to expand a gang violence prevention program in Central Harlem.
  • Save our Streets South Bronx, $35,000 to expand a gang violence prevention program in the South Bronx.
JOBS AND LEADERSHIP FOR YOUNG ADULTS
  • East Harlem Employment Service, $100,000 to provide literacy coaching and counseling in a program that helps unemployed teenagers and young adults prepare for jobs.
  • Rockaway Youth Task Force, $25,000 to expand a leadership program in which Far Rockaway teens start a farmers market, register residents to vote, and help neighbors rebuild after superstorm Sandy.
TECH JOB PIPELINE
  • Coalition for Queens, $77,000 to become a technology workforce hub for Queens by combining its services for employers and job seekers.
  • Per Scholas, $150,000 to expand three technology skills training courses that will employ graduates in Per Scholas’ new Urban Development Center, which offers software testing services to businesses.
IMPROVING SERVICES FOR 16- AND 17-YEAR-OLDS FACING JAIL TIME
  • Brooklyn Defender Services, $65,000 for case-management for teenage offenders in Brooklyn so they can get social services, job training, and drug rehabilitation.
  • Center for Court Innovation, $150,000 to divert more 16- and 17-year-olds from jail and into an alternative program providing counseling, academic, and mental health support.
HUMAN JUSTICE
  • A Better Balance: The Work and Family Legal Center, $75,000 to help workers take advantage of sick leave and other new workplace rights.
  • Immigrant Justice Corps, $100,000 to train non-lawyers to provide immigration legal help through community groups.
  • New York Immigration Coalition, $90,000 to advocate for immigrants in the New York State health insurance exchange.
  • Sanctuary for Families, $90,000 to advocate for and provide legal services to victims of human trafficking.
PEOPLE’S JOURNALISM
  • Brooklyn Movement Center, $50,000 for Brooklyn Deep, an online news service by and for community residents in central Brooklyn.
AFFORDABLE HOUSING
  • Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development, $65,000 for a report examining the use of “inclusionary zoning” as an incentive to developers to build affordable housing.
  • Historic Districts Council, $60,000 to report on the effect of historic preservation on the creation and retention of affordable housing.
BOLSTERING BROOKLYN AND BRONX BUSINESSES
  • Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation, $120,000 to help businesses in the Brooklyn Navy Yard identify and meet labor needs.
  • Northwest Bronx Community and Clergy Coalition, $50,000 to expand the number of Bronx contractors that can install energy-efficient building retrofits.
  • Start Small, Think Big!, $50,000 to help small businesses succeed in the Bronx.
REDUCING EXPOSURE TO TOXIC CHEMICALS
  • Clean Production Action, $100,000 to speed up the phase-out of toxic chemicals by sharing information on how companies use them.
  • Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, $87,500 to use new techniques to study how toxic chemicals affect protein development in newborns and children.
  • University of Massachusetts-Lowell, $75,000 to work with industry on using safer chemicals in consumer products.
CLEAN ENERGY
  • Environmental Law and Policy Center, $125,000 to help develop renewable energy resources by eliminating regulatory barriers and improving clean energy infrastructure.
  • Great Plains Institute for Sustainable Development, $100,000 to advocate for transmission upgrades needed to develop wind and solar energy resources.
  • Oregon Environmental Council, $150,000 to strengthen clean energy initiatives and carbon pricing measures along the Pacific Coast.
A SUSTAINABLE PLANET
  • Funders’ Network for Smart Growth and Livable Communities, $100,000 to support partnerships between public sustainability directors and local foundations.
  • Wildlife Conservation Society, $100,000 to protect wildlife in the Northern Rockies by reconnecting habitat separated by developed areas.
EXPANDING COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
  • Cypress Hills Local Development Corporation, $50,000 to add communication and planning capacity.
  • St. Nicks Alliance, $50,000 for a technology upgrade to provide case-management services and track client outcomes.
  • Support Center for Nonprofit Management, $65,000 to support nonprofit boards considering mergers and other forms of restructuring.
Please contact Amy Wolf at (212) 686-0010 x234 if you would like more information or to talk to one of our issue experts about any of the grants above.

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The New York Community Trust
Since 1924, The New York Community Trust has been the home of charitable New Yorkers who share a passion for the City and its suburbs—and who are committed to improving them. The Trust supports an array of effective nonprofits that help make the City a vital and secure place to live, learn, work, and play, while building permanent resources for the future. The New York Community Trust ended 2013 with assets of $2.4 billion in more than 2,000 charitable funds, and made grants totaling $141 million. The Trust welcomes new donors. Information at nycommunitytrust.org.

 





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