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12/9/14 - New York Community Trust Gives $7.4 Million to 51 Nonprofits Across the City and Nationally in Final Round of 2014 Grants



      FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
      CONTACT
      Amy Wolf (212) 686-0010 x234, aw@nyct-cfi.org
      David Marcus, (212) 889-3963, dlm@nyct-cfi.org

New York Community Trust Gives $7.4 Million to 51 Nonprofits
Across the City and Nationally in Final Round of 2014 Grants


New York (Dec. 9, 2014)—The New York Community Trust is making grants to help poor coastal communities prepare for climate change; start a nonprofit leadership training program at Baruch College; figure out why very few immigrants run for elected office; develop new ways to measure and fight poverty; help seniors who abuse drugs and alcohol; and more. In all, 51 groups are receiving $7.4 million.

ELDER SUBSTANCE ABUSE

  • Jewish Home Lifecare, $120,000 to expand a substance abuse program for elders in a rehabilitation facility in the Bronx.

MENTAL HEALTH CARE FOR COURT-INVOLVED YOUNG PEOPLE

  • Center for Alternative Sentencing and Employment Services, $70,000 to expand mental health clinics for court-involved young people in Harlem and Brooklyn.

PAID INTERNSHIPS

  • City University of New York, $265,000 to enable City University and Honors College students to participate in paid internships.
  • Rocking the Boat, $100,000 to expand a paid internship program that prepares Bronx high school and college students for environmental and maritime careers.

HOUSING

  • EIS Housing Resource Center, $40,000 to provide counseling, legal help, psychiatric referrals, and low-cost apartment cleaning to hoarding seniors at risk of eviction.
  • Enterprise Community Partners, $100,000 to improve energy efficiency and water conservation in affordable housing.
  • Healthy Building Network, $60,000 to encourage use of healthier building materials in affordable housing.

COASTAL RESILIENCE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

  • American Red Cross Greater New York Region, $110,000 to help downstate nonprofits develop disaster preparedness and resiliency plans.
  • Association of National Estuary Programs, $150,000 to strengthen the climate resilience of poor waterfront communities on Staten Island and in Alabama and Puerto Rico.
  • Environmental Law Institute, $80,000 to help local governments restore and manage the flood-prone properties they acquire with federal funds.

MAKING SOCIAL WORK BETTER

  • Azusa Pacific University, Department of Social Work, $15,000 to expand the definition of poverty in the U.S., to include not just income, but literacy, longevity, and living standards.
  • Hunter College of CUNY, Silberman School of Social Work, $77,000 for a new leadership program for deputy directors and chief operating officers of human services agencies.
  • NASW (National Association of Social Workers) Foundation, $585,000 to work with the Council on Social Work Education on a new scholarship program in 10 schools for baccalaureate, masters, and doctoral social work students focusing on health care.
  • Social Work Education Project, $1,000,000 to enable social workers to be more aware of and responsive to the social policy context of their work through changes in social work education curriculum and field practice, research, and career path development.
  • University at Albany SUNY, School of Social Welfare, $100,000 to elevate the issue of homelessness as a priority in the social work profession.

A TOOL TO FIGHT POVERTY

  • Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies, $25,000 to develop a social indicators report for New York City neighborhoods. Data on education, health, housing, economic security, and community safety will be compiled to inform policymakers, planners, and community leaders.

A BOOST FOR YOUNG WOMEN

  • Borough of Manhattan Community College Foundation, $115,000 to improve retention and graduation of minority students, particularly young women.
  • Year Up, $130,000 to increase the number of young women who enroll in information technology training classes.

IMMIGRANT LEADERS

  • New American Leaders Project, $20,000 to research factors that determine whether or not Latino and Asian-American immigrants run for public office.

URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING

  • Regional Plan Association, $100,000 to develop a comprehensive plan for the tri-state region that includes housing, transportation, energy, climate change, and other factors.
  • Rockaway Waterfront Alliance, $50,000 to promote a bike and pedestrian corridor under the elevated “A” train tracks connecting the Far Rockaways to Rockaway Park.

MARKET APPROACHES TO CURB CLIMATE CHANGE

  • CERES, $100,000 to mobilize the insurance industry to address climate change.
  • Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM), $75,000 to accelerate the introduction of electric vehicles in Northeast and West Coast states.

IMPROVING FOOD AND FARM POLICIES

  • Jessie Smith Noyes Foundation, $75,000 to train local leaders across the country who can advocate for healthier national food and farming policies.

A NEW PROGRAM TO BUILD NONPROFIT LEADERSHIP

  • Bernard M. Baruch College of CUNY, $450,000 to launch The New York Community Trust Leadership Fellows program, a leadership development and management training program for mid-level nonprofit managers.

BETTER JOB TRAINING FOR BETTER JOBS

  • New York City Employment and Training Coalition, $100,000 to help City workforce development organizations involve employers in their programs.
  • Trial Opportunity Partnership, $75,000 to improve transitional jobs for hard-to-employ job seekers.
  • Workforce Development Corporation, $150,000 for an employer-led initiative to expand technology careers for disadvantaged workers.
  • Workforce Professionals Training Institute, $80,000 to increase the effectiveness of professionals who help job-seekers.

ARTS AND CULTURE

  • International Documentary Association, $222,000 for awards to documentary filmmakers that are in early stages of production on films that support the aims and concepts of filmmaker Pare Lorentz.
  • Public Theater, $160,000 for a program that recruits and encourages first-time theater-goers.
  • Young People’s Chorus of New York City, $147,000 to provide four-year scholarships for four music students.

SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT

  • National Economic and Social Rights Initiative, $75,000 to advocate for alternatives to suspension in the City’s schools.
  • New Visions for Public Schools, $160,000 to train teams of teachers and principals to improve struggling schools.
  • PTALink, $60,000 to help public school parent associations follow regulations and improve their children’s schools.

TEACHING EARLY READERS

  • Teachers College, Columbia University, $213,000 to study and provide recommendations for the City’s network of nonprofits that help schools teach students to read in the early grades.
  • Teaching Matters, $600,000 to train more than 200 teachers in high poverty schools to provide quality reading instruction in the early grades.

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH

  • Columbia University, Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center, $90,000 for research into the cellular mechanisms of Type 2 diabetes.
  • Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, $92,000 to study osteosarcoma, a bone cancer in children.
  • Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, $21,000 to study new methods to reduce hospital-acquired infections.

HEALTH SYSTEMS AND POLICY

  • New York Academy of Medicine, $60,000 to develop a plan to improve long-term care in New York State.
  • Mental Health Association of New York City, $115,000 to train downstate nonprofits in mental health first aid—with a five-step plan to help those in crisis.

PLANNING FOR A HEALTHIER SOUTH BRONX
The following grants are the first in our South Bronx Healthy and Livable Neighborhoods program that aims to improve health through addressing everything from healthy food and parks, to arts programs, to chronic disease management.

  • $45,000 each to BronxWorks (Mott Haven), Claremont Neighborhood Centers (Morrisania), and Urban Health Plan (Hunts Point), to plan comprehensive neighborhood health improvement programs.
  • Fund for Public Health in New York, $100,000 to adapt an online neighborhood health database for South Bronx community organizations.
  • New York State Health Foundation, $100,000 to evaluate the South Bronx Healthy and Livable Neighborhoods program.

THE FUTURE OF APPALACHIA
The following grants are made from the Oakey L. and Ethel Witherspoon Alexander Fund, set up in The Trust to help the people of Appalachia.

  • Appalachian Citizens’ Law Center, $70,000 to help victims of black lung disease.
  • Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program, $150,000 for job training and new business development in Appalachia.
  • Kentucky Coalition, $350,000 to accelerate the transition to a clean energy economy in Appalachia.

THE NEW YORK COMMUNITY TRUST
Since 1924, The New York Community Trust has been the home of charitable New Yorkers who share a passion for the City and its suburbs—and who are committed to improving them. The Trust supports an array of effective nonprofits that help make the City a vital and secure place to live, learn, work, and play, while building permanent resources for the future. The New York Community Trust ended 2013 with assets of $2.4 billion in more than 2,000 charitable funds, and made grants totaling $141 million. The Trust welcomes new donors. Information at nycommunitytrust.org.

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