Annual Report: Become a Donor - The New York Community Trust
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For Attorneys and Financial Advisors
Meet the Team

Join Us and Turn Your Assets

Into a Force for Good.

Together, we can make a powerful impact. Help New Yorkers recover from the pandemic, improve education, champion the environment, nurture the arts. Whatever your passion, we can help connect your charitable dollars with well-managed, effective organizations doing work that makes a difference.

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YOU DECIDE WHAT TO GIVE, HOW MUCH TO GIVE, AND WHAT TO NAME YOUR FUND. 

We accept a wide variety of assets, and most funds can be started with a simple letter of agreement or a single paragraph in a will. You also can contribute a one-time or recurring gift to The Trust to meet urgent needs in the city.

CHOOSE FROM OUR INVESTMENT OPTIONS AND GROW YOUR FUND TAX-FREE OVER TIME. 

Because The New York Community Trust is a public charity, donors get the maximum benefit allowed by law. 

JOIN A COMMUNITY OF GENEROSITY 

As a donor, you are invited to attend briefings on issues affecting our region, meet with philanthropic advisors, and join a community of generosity. 

Two ladies walking with text that says, "We are Philanthropists."

ABOVE: This image is from a Trust social media campaign to encourage giving with The Trust. Design by Mar Asayan; photo: Shutterstock

Giving through The New York Community Trust is simple and powerful.
Get in touch with us: (212) 686-0010 x363 | giving@nyct-cfi.org

Donor's View

Local brownstones on a tree-lined street.

Dedicated to a Life of Service

Roger Juan Maldonado is a trustee emeritus of The Trust, partner at Smith Gambrell Russell LLP, and a past president of the New York City Bar Association. He established a fund in The Trust in 2007 and is a member of our Legacy Society.

 

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My father and grandfather were both Army veterans and my mother gave birth to me at a military base, so I was literally born into a world of public service.

While in law school, I worked one summer helping people in Vieques, Puerto Rico, who were trying to stop the U.S. Navy from using a portion of their island as a bombing range during military exercises. After that experience, I said, ‘This is what I want to do.’

When I moved to New York, I joined South Brooklyn Legal Services, which let me continue to serve those who needed help. I also have advocated for years on behalf of children with disabilities.

Joining The Trust’s board was a natural extension of my desire to serve people in need. For decades I have felt deeply tied to the communities of New York City that I have been involved with throughout my legal career. That work has helped me both understand what’s important in life and what is needed to give back.

When I created a fund in The Trust, I stipulated that staff could use it in whatever way they thought was best. It was easy to make that call because The Trust makes grants to wonderful organizations that are frequently trying something new to address what had been an intractable problem.

I learned from discussions with The Trust’s grantees about the devastating health and economic impact of the pandemic within so many communities of color. It was just so sobering to get a sense of how COVID was exacerbating what were already difficult conditions. It was a ‘wow’ moment that cemented my desire and commitment to continue to help.

Whether it is through work with my clients or through The Trust, I’ve been able to help make a difference and that’s important to me and incredibly fulfilling.”

"Whether it is through work with my clients or through The Trust, I’ve been able to help make a difference and that’s important to me and incredibly fulfilling.” 
– Roger Juan Maldonado

Carrying on her Father’s Legacy

Hallie S. Hobson is the Harlem-based founder and principal of HSH Consulting LLC, a boutique management consulting firm supporting nonprofit arts organizations. She created a fund in The Trust to honor her late father, Emmy award-winning television producer Charles Hobson, who, beginning in the 1960s, produced pioneering programs that gave a powerful voice to Black New Yorkers and helped dissipate racial stereotypes.

In philanthropy, I think it’s important to put your dollars where your values are. It takes resources to bring good into the world, so we should commit to causes that are important to us and support them.

I’ve lived all over the country, but I fell in love with New York because of its energy and vibrant arts community. One of the incredible things about New York is you don’t have to buy a ticket and go in to see a show at a museum or theater. There’s just magic on the streets all the time in these serendipitous encounters with people and culture.

I first became passionate about the arts because of my parents. My father was a documentary filmmaker. My mother, Cheryl Chisholm, worked in publishing and at the Smithsonian Museum of African Art—and is now completing her PhD. We always went to museums, concerts, and dance performances—and perhaps more importantly—knew painters, writers, dancers, all kinds of makers. Arts, culture, and creativity are just an organic part of who I am.

I know artists and visionaries have dreams of what they want to bring to the world. As creatives themselves, both my parents instilled in me the importance of resourcing ideas to make them something tangible, so that’s a lens that I’ve brought to my love of the arts.

After my father died in 2019, I realized that creating a fund in his name could be a great way to pay tribute to him. The fund has been a fun reason to talk to people about his legacy and share memories. And now people who knew my father know there’s this vehicle they can use to honor him and his work. It’s a living, growing resource.”

"After my father died in 2019, I realized that creating a fund in his name could be a great way to pay tribute to him. The fund has been a fun reason to talk to people about his legacy and share memories. And now people who knew my father know there’s this vehicle they can use to honor him and his work. It’s a living, growing resource.”
– Hallie S. Hobson